Torchlight mods and mini review

The first wave of mods have begun hitting the net for Torchlight and while searching it’s going to be a long wait before some ardent fans start tackling an undertaking as huge as an equivalent to Diablo 2’s PENULTIMATE Zyel Mod, but here’s a couple goodies.

First off is Torchleech – a mod manager extraordinare.

Second is really the first mod that has piqued my interest (I’m not very interested in the ‘little tweak’ type mods at all) and that’s Starch the Monster Hunter— a new NPC with a new set of maps and a handful of new monsters, all surrounding the post-main storyline gameplay in the infinite dungeon.

My review of Torchlight is really pointless as I have 100% recommend it to everyone I know and love.  In short, they nailed the look and feel, nailed the feel and flow of the combat but they missed the boat on the crafting/enchanting.  I expected more out of the game in terms of crafting items.  Since Diablo 1, we have picked up thousands of items that were largely useless to us except to lug around and sell, and Torchlight is no different over a decade later.  Later Diablo-clones have created a way for the crap items to be harvested to make better stuff or a visual cue that you should ignore them when they are lying on the ground.   For example, if you have 3 normal swords of the same type, you can craft those into a low level magical sword, and with three of those, you can get to the next tier, and so on.  While there are sockets in Torchlight, and Enchanting, you end up piling your pet with rubbish to sell for a pittance most of the time.  Granted, the pet running off to town is a brilliant idea, which , guaranteed, will be stolen by Blizzard if D3 ever comes out.

What’s more, any discussion of the game needs to mention that Torchlight not being multiplayer.  Except for a few visual glitches here and there and the fact that they seem to still have a model’s shadow displaying through ceilings like Hellgate London, that’s about the only complaints I have.  That said, I heartily endorse Torchlight and think it’s got a great future as a brand.  I’m only on my second play through and while I loved my Alchemist in my first play through, I absolutely adore the Destroyer class.   It’s one of those games like Dominons 3, Strange Adventures in Infinite Space and especially Mount & Blade that will probably never leave my hard drive.

Expansions

Wife: Well it can’t be that much, it’s just an expansion.

– Probably 20-30 Dollars, but I saw an expansion in the store today that was 60$.

Wife: Woah, that must be a pretty terrible game* to need such an expensive expansion.

*Twilight Imperium 3rd Edition

BF Bad Company 2

Huffing the Console FPS choad, DICE failed to bring BF Bad Company 1 out for the PC.  While it may have been to keep sales of the extremely popular Battlefield 2 and, while less popular, the much improved Battlefield 2142 high, it was still a disappointment for fans of the series. However, BF Bad Company 2 is looking bad to the ass in many ways. In a confusing move, the beta for the game is out on the PS3 and not the PC so there is some choad huffing still going on.  However, there are some impressive vids to whet the whistle.

Why Don't We Run All The Time?

Walking out to my car in the cold I wondered to myself why do we insist that our characters in games run as near to 100% of the time, only slowing down for some treacherous traverse or to check out some piece of 3-D architecture, yet we walk around slow as molasses?  What’s the hurry we have in games that we certainly do not have in real life?

Given that I was given my right of passage through the parabolic showers of gibs of Quake 1, where it is only possible to be stopped or run at a uniform, top speed at all times, I get confused at the ability with, say, an analog control stick, to move at LESS than a uniform, 100% top speed. With all the years of FPS WASD–I had forgotten that this type of movement has been completely missing from gaming until the most recent generation of consoles.  What’s more, the analog sticks, while ghastly slow for aiming, allow many more directional options than the 8-ways allowed in WASD.  That said, I still see few reasons to go less than full blast running in, say Crackdown, but then there’s Bayonetta–who’s walking animation simply has to be viewed over and over and over from every possible angle.  This post really was just a tangent to mention that walking animation.

A good deal more Analord

I just randomly checked Rephlex records today and while their site is undergoing a change, I noticed a swath of 2010 re-releases in the Analord series.  Originally thinking these were vinyl re-releases, I noticed one of the album covers was different and had a couple new tracks as well per record.  Turns out these are not on vinyl but pre-masted WAV files for digital download: each about 7$ a record.

Check it here

Emotionally responding to advertising directed at my specific demographic

Fantasy Flight began tantalizing us with skyscraper ads on boardgamegeek.com for the new Cosmic Encounter expansion late last week, and I must say, it’s working on me quite well.    I’ve wrestled recently with my own conclusions after hearing my wife declare, simply, that Cosmic Encounter is the greatest board game ever made.   It’s starting to become extremely difficult for me to deny this conclusion not only when faced with the jewel-like quality of the Fantasy Flight edition, but the fact that 35% of my boardgame playing in 2009 was Cosmic Encounter. This includes some of the ‘fast play’ type games like Inn Fighting and the much-worshiped Dominion.  We’ll have to see what happens in 2010: especially if anyone in my game group finally gets their dirty hands on Chaos in the Old World.

Getting Monked

Ah, Talisman…a chance for lady luck to have her way with us and endup passed out in the backseat with our underwear around our ankles most of the time–unless we draw the MONK! The grizzled veterans tell their tales and it’s well known that the Monk is  one of the top tier characters along with the Prophetess and the Astropath (from the Timescape expansion).  Depending on the expansions to 2nd edition that you have, it’s an ‘any given sunday’ situation with those three, but while the Prophetess can get stomped, and the Astropath can get a little unlucky raping the Timescape deck, the Monk has few weaknesses at any point in the game.  Having now played my 11th game of 4th Edition2.0 Talisman from Fantasy Flight, it’s become clear, with the Astropath awaiting his appearance (in some form or other) and the Prophetess nerfed (in a rather good way I might add), that the Monk– if played without the mega-nerf from the Fantasy Flight upgrade pack– is lord and master of Talismanland.  Out of the 11 games,  4 had the Monk, and of those 4, only one game did the Monk not prevail due to a late-game Toading no less.

That said, I want to explain why I think, unfortunately, he cannot be fixed in the present edition.

First and foremost, one of the major changes to Talisman 4th Edition from 2nd is the ability for characters to take Craft-based enemies as Trophies.  Trophies are the new name for when you defeat an enemy in battle and take the card and when the amount of strength (or craft) = 7, you can turn it in for a strength (or craft).  In 2nd Edition Talisman, only Strength-based enemies could be taken as trophies.  Craft was gained in other ways (rolling the mystic, craft spells, etc.).  Hence the path to victory for craft-based characters was longer and a bit more arduous– however, most had advantages over their strength-based characters with better special abilities or constant access to spells.  What’s more, the route to the crown of command was less dangerous via the craft method: the Mine route has the character face the Vampire Lord, who has the potential to be far less deadly than the equivalent on the Strength side–Dicing with Death.

The addition of allowing characters to take craft-based trophies, while logical in many respects, breaks with the original design of the game.  It allows characters to ramp up their Craft with a speed unheard of in the older editions (just a note: I don’t really count 3rd as canonical).  The traffic of characters going through the Mines-Vampire-Pit Fiend pathway to the middle as increased massively as a result (as noted above, it’s always better to hit the Vampire up there compared to the sometimes fatal Dice with Death on the Crypt side), but more importantly, it increases the Characters who start with a high craft and can attack other characters using Psychic Combat (Ghoul, Wizard, Sorceress) ability to have a whole pile of craft to crush in PVP.  While those three characters are solidly in the second rank (the Sorceress may be in the first rank) in terms of character tiers, the character this fundamental change to the game effects the most is, predictably, the Monk.

Let’s have a look at what the Monk can do other than sit there and look like a fat slob:

sd_monk-reference

Str: 2, Craft 3, Lives 4, Fate: 5 (!?)

Special Abilities:

Your inner belief allows you to add your craft value to your strength during battle
After rolling the dice for praying, you may add one to the score.
You may not use any weapon or armor during battle.

So, our man here starts with one seemingly major disadvantage with his inability to us any weapons or armor in combat, a minor advantage with the praying bonus, and what has always been the greatest single skill in the game– adding your craft to your strength score in combat as if the character always had a warhorse or always had a Psionic Blast spell.   This gives the Monk an effective 5 strength out of the gate as well as the ability to increase this with an increase in either Strength or Craft– a huge advantage over all the other strength-based characters who can only increase their combat value with weapons (at most 3 strength) and Strength increases.  Given that in the old edition, Craft was not all that easy to come by, the Monk was still very powerful, but with the addition of Craft Trophies in 4th edition, the Monk is well nigh unstoppable and had to be nerfed.

The 4th edition 2.0 Fantasy Flight nerf to this power is listed in the description above.  Note the word ‘Value’ next to craft — this means that the Monk can only add his starting Craft to his strength for the entire game, regardless of his current Craft score, and that amounts to a measly +3 in combat.   This kicks the Monk from the top tier to down somewhere around the Elf for effectiveness.  Sure, the Monk has an early advantage in that he can rack up some strength Trophies along side the likes of the Troll or the Ogre Chieftain without the weakness to Craft enemies, but this is going to be short lived.  Since Talisman scales itself as characters gain in Strength and Craft, a +3 advantage has a minor effect in the mid game, when players have 6-11 strength and rather useless in the late game when players are pushing 12-20 strength.  In addition, the inability to use weapons or armor, a minor drawback in 2nd edition, becomes a major flaw for the Monk in 4th.

Now we have a character who’s original ability ported over to the new edition of Talisman is heavily unbalanced (and in a game as unbalanced as Talisman, that’s saying something!) and a nerf to that ability that makes him far too weak to compete.  What was the solution? Tack on a heavy load of Fate points!   Though characters of Good alignment cannot normally get their Fate points back, a whopping 5 really shows to me that the design team was reaching to try to bring the Monk back to parity, even to characters of mid-range power.

At this point in this post, I would normally bust out my ingenious solution to this design problem and say it’s the best (though, of course, not playtested nearly enough) and say something like’ how could the designers not thought of it?’  The solution or even good suggestions for this problem, however, I do not have.    One way would be to disallow the Monk to gain Craft or Strength trophies during the game, but then you may be back to nerfing the character so much that he’s, again, as bad as the Elf.  A second may be to change the Monk’s alignment to Neutral rather than Good.  Though Fate is good, healing for free at the Chapel any time you need to is even better and means trying to PVP the Monk early game (as say the Troll or Sorceress) is a real chore.  The third idea would be simply to increase the amount of Warhorses in the Adventure deck and (especially) add one into the Purchase deck.  This will allow most savvy players to at least attempt duplicate the Monk’s ability.  Again, none of these three ideas are what I would consider a good fix for the problem. That said, I think the Monk as printed in the original 4th Edition was a glaring, overpowered oversight due to the addition of Craft trophies, but the 4th 2.0 fix makes the Monk so weak that he’s rarely going to see play–and it’s also a terribly boring power to have.

Furiously Pumping

A certain person wanders into town during holidays that works at a certain game company we know and love.  Civilities are exchanged, some small talk and maybe a game of Cosmic Encounter or two–yet inevitably conversation devolves into pumping him for information about what he’s working on.

me: Ok, can you talk at all about what you’re working on right now?

person: I really can’t…I want to, though.

me: Is it more Fallout?

person: no.

me: is it an MMO?

person: no.

me: I’m just going to assume that it’s in the Elder Scrolls series then.

person: it’s possible.

Affixing the Bayonetta

smooth!The all-to-brief-time off during the holidays has allowed time for gaming indulgences that wouldn’t normally fit into the schedule.  Along with a marathon boardgame session last night (Dominion, Dragon Lairds and a virgin copy of Nexus Ops hit the table), I was able to take 20 minutes and wrap my fingers around the Xbox controller for a run at the sumptuous Bayonetta demo.   When one is blurting out filthy epithets like  ‘holy shit yeah’ and ‘fucking awesome’ when no one else is around to hear, it can mean a few things, but in regards to the Bayonetta demo– it means you are experiencing the non-stop climax action AS ADVERTISED.  After the short tutorial; the first conflict with the angels takes place on the surface of a shattered clock tower as it plummets off a cliff to the ground below: full on showing off the jaw-dropping visuals.  The character designs, especially the leading lady herself, are truly inspired– massive ‘angels’ with emotionless cherub faces and giant battle axes named “Beloved,”  long, flowing, snake-like dragons in an asylum mix of Eastern and Western mythology.

The controls and basic combos are extremely simple to learn, and many of the moves are conditional to your surroundings; depending on distance, above/below in relation to the enemies.  In fact, most combos will just come out with your flailing fingers button mashing, at least at first.  Much to my glee- the game has an evade button much like Godhand (which, yes, I was not man enough to complete yet), but with the added bonus of allowing you ‘Witch Time’ if you evade attacks at just the right moment.  I haven’t seen many of the torture moves yet, but the two I’ve seen (throwing someone into an iron maiden, and running another through a set of pullies and gears) were fairly impressive.

I’m fighting the urge to span some more time running through it again or wait until the full version is out.  It’s not a fight I can win.